Welcome to the home of The Question Evolution Project. Presenting information demonstrating that there is no truth in minerals-to-man evolution, and presenting evidence for special creation. —Established by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Monday, November 11, 2013

More Problems in Dinosaur Evolution

Things just keep getting worse regarding evolution for fundamentalist evolutionists. Aside from being unable to give a satisfactory answer of what dinosaurs evolved from, and the fact that soft tissues have been found in dinosaur fossils, the acolytes of evolutionism keep clinging to their faith despite the evidence.

NASA/Earth Observatory
To make matters worse, a tyrannosaur has been found with "advanced" features in "older" rock layers. This requires yet more rewriting of evolutionary conjectures. But worse than that is where it was found, and what else has been discovered there. Interestingly, these scientists "know" how the creature acted based on its appearance, seemingly forgetting the fierce teeth of the fruit bat and panda, or the fact that there are vegetarian piranha. They should know that appearances can be deceiving, but I digress. They would not be thrown into such a tizzy if they realized that Noachian Flood models explained the situations far better than uniformitarian geology and evolution.
Remarkably advanced tyrannosaur too low on the evolutionary staircase complicates dinosaur lineage.
The newest named member of the tyrannosaur family tree is leading evolutionary paleontologists to redraw the map of how tyrannosaurs evolved. Unearthed in 2009 from the Upper Cretaceous portion of southern Utah’s Grand Staircase in the Wahweap Formation, conventionally dated at about 80 million years, the new tyrannosaur species has been dubbed Lythronax argestes. Lythronax earned its moniker meaning “king of gore” by possessing the same sort of skull anatomy that many paleontologists believe made Tyrannosaurus rex a “dinosaur king,” but 10 to 12 million years before T. rex evolved. 
...the reconstructed skull of Lythronax argestes, a newly named species of tyrannosaur. Paleontologists think it would have been about 24 feet long and stood 8 feet tall at the hip, based on the size of the bones that were recovered. Found in southern Utah’s Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, conventional millions-of-years dating would place this so-called “king of gore” too early in the evolutionary timeline, which must be redrawn to make it fit.
You really should finish reading "New Tyrannosaur Pushes Back Evolutionary Timeline".



Looking for a comment area?
You can start your own conversation by using the buttons below!

Labels