Welcome to the home of The Question Evolution Project. Presenting information demonstrating that there is no truth in minerals-to-man evolution, and presenting evidence for special creation. —Established by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Bizarre Analysis of Grand Canyon Age

A new method of determining the age of the Grand Canyon is doing more harm than good. The Evo Sith are still clinging to their interpretations of uniformitarian geology, but the evidence indicates a global Flood. This latest method gives widely differing ages for different sections of the Grand Canyon.
A new method of determining the age of the Grand Canyon is doing more harm than good. Evolutionary scientists are still clinging to their interpretations of uniformitarian geology, but the evidence indicates a global Flood.
Image Credit: US Geological Survey
Some evolutionary scientists are now saying that because there are differing ages in the testing methods, there must be several different canyons that were united later on. Like with radiometric dating, there are assumptions, interpretations and other pitfalls with the data. This will probably raise more questions than answers. If they took of their Darwin spectacles and used the Noachian Flood perspective, scientists would have more consistent and believable results.
Is the Grand Canyon old or young? Both, geologists are now saying. The latest theory, though, is unlikely to end the 140-year debate.
As if on cue, the leading science news outlets simultaneously issued stories about the Grand Canyon’s age. This is because they are all in cahoots with an “embargo” process that doesn’t let the public learn about a paper till all the talking points and artwork are ready. PhysOrg, New Scientist, National Geographic, Live Science, the BBC News, Science Now and Nature News were all ready with the same line, differing only in minor details, headline and wording.
The basic ideas are these: There’s been a 140-year controversy about the age of Grand Canyon. Recent theories have battled between ages of 5 million years up to 70 million years (11/29/12). American geologists publishing a new paper in Nature Geoscience used helium thermochronometry throughout the canyon and got dramatically different results from place to place. They decided that parts of the canyon are young, 5–6 million years old, some are middle-aged, 15–25 million years old, and some are old, 70 million years old. The canyon, they surmise, consists of five “paleocanyons” (draining different ancient rivers) that were joined together 5–6 million years ago by the Colorado River. So that’s the official word—for now. But will it satisfy the warring parties?
You can finish reading "Grand Canyon Age Changes Again".



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