Welcome to the home of The Question Evolution Project. Presenting information demonstrating that there is no truth in minerals-to-man evolution, and presenting evidence for special creation. —Established by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Friday, March 27, 2015

Showing Backbone in the Cambrian Explosion

The Cambrian explosion is a serious problem for evolutionists, yet they keep trying to salvage evidence for their paradigm from it. The reality is that the Cambrian layers give evidence of creation, and also the Genesis Flood.

One of the biggest burrs under the saddles of evolutionary paleontologists is the Cambrian explosion. According to their paradigm, fossils were made gradually, showing evolution from simpler to more complex life forms, over millions of years. The Cambrian layer has many fossilized life forms that are fully developed, and evolutionists have struggled to explain this away. By the way, fossils in the pre-Cambrian? Not so much. That makes things worse for them.

David Attenborough does evolution documentaries, and he discussed a critter that supposedly was an ancestor to modern backbones. As is typical in these kinds of discussions, it is speculation without basis. In fact, what is found in the Cambrian explosion is evidence of creation (there are no undisputed transitional forms of something changing into something else), and also supports the Genesis Flood — especially with those well-preserved soft tissues that show sudden burial. Yippie ky yay, secularists!
The evolutionary origin of vertebrates 525 million years ago is the subject of a captivating video recently featured on Smithsonian.com. In this lavishly illustrated five-minute clip, charismatic evolutionary spokesman David Attenborough explains how a paper clip-sized Cambrian creature called Myllokunmingia has revealed how and when life took its first successful step toward the development of a backbone.
To discover when the first sign of a backbone appeared, Sir David takes us to China’s Chengjiang Formation where Myllokunmingia—which he says is “the earliest creature we know of that we can truly call a vertebrate”—was found in a Lower Cambrian rock layer. China’s Chengjiang Formation and Canada’s Burgess Shale are two famous sites revealing the Cambrian explosion—the abrupt appearance of diverse animals deep in the fossil record.
To read the rest, click on "Cambrian Explosion or Creation Week—Key to Vertebrate Success?
     

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