Welcome to the home of The Question Evolution Project. Presenting information demonstrating that there is no truth in minerals-to-man evolution, and presenting evidence for special creation. —Established by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Saturday, May 27, 2017

Pupplies Help a Child's Health?

Way back in the olden days, we had a small dog, but my parents were not overly concerned with protecting me from the unsanitary beast. Nor were they all that worried about unsanitary cats, once they became part of the family. Proper hygiene was in order, and that was enough. (By the way, some people have scared pregnant women into avoiding cats, but the danger there is mitigated by taking care when changing the litter box.) I know people who would want to have "kisses" from their German Shepherd and have her lick their faces, even on the lips. I can't do that.

Children Playing with Puppies, William Collins, 1812
The idea that dogs' mouths are cleaner than ours is a myth, they have their own bacterial flora. No need to overreact, though. Our society has been "too clean" these past years (the word germaphobe is used too freely in my opinion, as a true germaphobe suffers from obsessive-compulsive disorder), and are actually doing harm to ourselves and our children; we're lacking bacteria, microbes, and important things our system uses. 


So, Snoopy licked Lucy's face? He is probably doing her some good. Darwinists appeal to "co-evolution" to explain these things, but it's a "scientific explanation" pulled out of thin air. The fact is, certain bacteria were created for our benefit, and we were created to use them.
Many people react with revulsion when a dog licks their face—especially babies. Such a reaction is justifiable based on the unsanitary habits of Rover. However, recent research supports the idea that babies actually benefit from living with dogs.
 . . .
These authors approach human-microbe relationships from an evolutionary “survival of the fittest” worldview where life develops through a long progression of deadly struggles. The host-microbe relationship is regularly portrayed in warlike terms, which explains why puppy microbes are labeled “pathogens” even though they do not cause disease. The system that links the infant to the beneficial microbes is also labeled an “immune” system which conveys a defensive concept rather than functioning as the comprehensive regulatory interface it actually is.
To fetch this article in its entirety, click on "Puppies Provide Protection".
  

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