Welcome to the home of The Question Evolution Project. Presenting information demonstrating that there is no truth in minerals-to-man evolution, and presenting evidence for special creation. —Established by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Polystrate Fossils and Long-Age Duplicity

Although we discussed polystrate fossils a few months ago (see "Let Me Be Polystrate With You"), it is time to run the subject up the flagpole again and see who salutes it. Like the problems of soft tissues, DNA, and such in dinosaur fossils, assorted rescuing devices are manufactured.


We have seen before that polystrate fossils are a serious problem for secular geologists. Now we can see how they ignore the many problems of these in the Joggins layers.
Original image from GoodFreePhotos / Paula Piccard
The main approach of secular geology is uniformitarianism, but occasionally Janus-faced geologists will invoke catastrophes when their philosophies fail. They have even imagined multiple small floods without evidence instead of the best explanation: the global Genesis Flood. Polystrate fossils are a serious problem, and these are often completely ignored in textbooks and such.

Wikipedia, that font of secularist propaganda, does not have a section on polystrate fossils, but there is a sentence in the fundamentally dishonest section on creationism about what creationists believe. Of course, they wave the fossils off without providing a reasonable explanation for their existence. Up yonder in Nova Scotia is an area called Joggins. There are numerous polystrate fossils there, but they are not mentioned in the Wikipedia section on the fossils there except for a drawing from 1868 of an "upright fossil". Like mainstream news sources, if something is inconvenient for a narrative, it tends to be ignored. That does not make the Flood any less real nor does it support secular geology.
Polystrate fossils punch vertically through multiple layers, or strata, within a geological formation. They have been a mainstay of the debates in geology going all the way back to the earliest days of the deep-time controversy arising in the 18th century. They remain relevant to the discussion today.
In the 1800s, the primary debate over geology was waged between the competing ideologies of uniformitarianism and catastrophism. The former believed in slow gradual processes and long time periods, while the latter believed in rapid processes over short time periods. For a while, uniformitarianism was the dominant view. Today, however, the preferred term by long-age geologists is ‘actualism’, as they have been forced by the overwhelming evidence to abandon strict, classical uniformitarianism (a.k.a. gradualism) and include catastrophes to explain many parts of the geological record.
To read the rest, run on over to "How the Joggins polystrate fossils falsify long ages".






Looking for a comment area?
You can start your own conversation by using the buttons below!

Labels