Welcome to the home of The Question Evolution Project. Presenting information demonstrating that there is no truth in minerals-to-man evolution, and presenting evidence for special creation. —Established by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Evolution and the Human Sense of Smell

We hear about how impressive the sense of smell is in animals, especially dogs. According to Darwinian mythology, humans do not have an acute sense of smell. People have believed that idea for a long time, but it's based on assumptions and conjecture, not actual science.


Human sense of smell far more acute than evolutionists led us to believe
Credit: Pixabay / shixugang
But just study on it for a spell. Ever wake up in the morning because you smelled coffee brewing? Or bacon frying? Maybe you were awakened by the smell of smoke and wanted to make sure your place wasn't on fire. Personal fragrances are sold at exorbitant prices. Know why? Because people can smell them. (Some are marketed to men with the idea that if women get a whiff of this particular fragrance on you, they'll — oh, you know.) Show of hands: how many people like the smell of cut grass? Various scents stir our memories and emotions. Interesting that we can save and reproduce sounds and visuals, and to some extent what we physically feel, but there are no recorders for smell and taste, but I digress.

Evolutionists essentially believe that we evolved our way out of our sense of smell to make room in our brains for language capacity. Since we're so highly evolved, our sense of smell became mostly vestigial — useless junk. No, we were created, and we have our parts for specific reasons. Those unscientific, unfounded evolutionary conjectures interfered with scientific research in this area for a mighty long time. That's changed.
We’ve all heard that, compared to mammalian animals like dogs, humans have a poor sense of smell. Did you know that this notion is a 19th century myth? And that this commonly accepted myth is based on an evolutionary idea rather than scientific evidence?

“Poor Human Olfaction Is a 19th Century Myth” — Rutgers University neuroscientist John McGann’s review published in Science — traces the origin and consequences of this belief and reviews evidence to the contrary. How good a sniffer you are, it turns out, depends on what you’re trying to sniff out and how you measure olfactory quality and ability.
To finish reading, nose on over to "Humans’ Poor Sense of Smell Is an Evolutionary Myth".
  

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