Welcome to the home of The Question Evolution Project. Presenting information demonstrating that there is no truth in minerals-to-man evolution, and presenting evidence for special creation. —Established by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Friday, October 31, 2014

Ants, Evolution and Zombies

The zombie mythology has evolved over the years, especially since popular movies of cannibalistic walking dead people became popular. Older stories are that zombies are dead people who were reanimated through witchcraft, slaves to their master, and could only be set free (or killed, depending on the story) by stuffing their mouths with salt. I don't cotton to zombie stories, but from what I gather, the new version varies, and zombification is pretty much the result of a pathogen. Skip the salt, they need to be shot in the head. Whatever the myth, people were taken over and had no will of their own.

That's similar to evolutionary theory, now that I study on it. People get indoctrinated in the pathogen of evolutionism, and that helps fuel their rebellion against their Creator. Their father down below, who fell because of pride (Isaiah 14.12-14, Ezekiel 28.11-19), controls their wills and encourages this prideful rebellion. We have evolution zombies walking around, spreading their pathogen and causing others to become like they are. Creation science ministries have the cure, and we want to see goo-to-you evolutionism put six feet under where it belongs. But I'm going off on a tangent. 




This post is about creatures who are not supernatural, but act like zombies. No, they don't eat brains. These ants have been taken over by a parasitic fungus and are controlled by it. Amazingly, researchers realized that although the ants were spreading the fungus, the fungus did not cause a full-on zombie outbreak and wipe out ant colonies. If a parasite was that thorough, it couldn't survive. Although the scientists are giving evolution the credit for this destructive behavior, they have no clue as to what went on, or why.

Real life zombies, like those in fiction, must ensure the spread and survival of the parasitic pathogen that creates them. If the parasitic hosts all go extinct, so will the parasites. Thus, through a tactical duel with death, carpenter ant colonies uniformly infected with a zombie-making fungus survive and thrive without succumbing to a zombie apocalypse. The colonies survive even as token members are driven to unnaturally position themselves where their spore-shedding corpses can rain down infectious fungal spores on their former fellows.
I won't ant-tagonize you any more, you can read the rest by clicking on "Zombie Ants and Genesis".
 


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