Welcome to the home of The Question Evolution Project. Presenting information demonstrating that there is no truth in minerals-to-man evolution, and presenting evidence for special creation. —Established by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Saturday, August 1, 2015

Refusing the Fused Chromosomes

A popular myth among evolutionists is that, since there is a difference in the number of chromosomes between humans and great apes, there must have been a chromosome 2 fusion way back when. The original speculations admitted that the supposed fusions were inconclusive, and further studies show many flaws that give lie to the story.

A popular myth among evolutionists is that, since there is a difference in the number of chromosomes between humans and great apes, there must have been a chromosome 2 fusion way back when. The original speculations admitted that the supposed fusions were inconclusive, and further studies show many flaws that give lie to the story.

Even at the outset, the sequence was 800 bases long, and not the thousands that it should have been. Data compared to known mutation rates, no sequence of satellite DNA at the alleged site of fusion, and many more. A creationist scientist is investigating further, and his findings are not evo-friendly. Fact is, we were created, old son, and did not evolve, despite the tales and tails.
One of the most common arguments evolutionists use to promote the theory that humans evolved from an apelike ancestor is the idea of a “chromosome 2 fusion.” This story proposes that in a common ancestor shared by humans and chimps, two small chromosomes somehow fused end to end to produce human chromosome 2. This supposedly explains the difference in chromosome numbers between humans and great apes—humans have 46 chromosomes, while great apes such as chimps, gorillas, and orangutans have 48.

To understand the concept associated with an end-to-end fusion model, it is important to know what the ends of chromosomes, telomeres, look like. Telomeres are made up of special chromosomal end sequences of the six-base DNA sequence TTAGGG that are repeated over and over again in perfect tandem. In fact, typical human telomeres are quite large, between 5,000 to 15,000 bases long.
To read the rest of the article, swing on over to "More DNA Evidence Against Human Chromosome Fusion".
  


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