Welcome to the home of The Question Evolution Project. Presenting information demonstrating that there is no truth in minerals-to-man evolution, and presenting evidence for special creation. —Established by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Monday, March 20, 2017

Bird Identity Theft and Passwords

Seems a mite interesting that some words have fallen by the wayside to some extent, then became somewhat reinvented for use in modern technology. F'rinstance, the first time I came across the word browser, I associated it with going shopping: "Can I help you?"..."No, just browsing". For that matter, the concept of identity theft existed since way back when (think of the pseudepigrapha), but the actual phrase is fairly recent.

A password is something you type for certain kinds of computer access, but was spoken for access to a Prohibition-era speakeasy, and back even further in the olden days. The word hijack may have originated during Prohibition as well. Someone driving a load of illegal hooch has someone come up and say, "Hi, Jack", shove a smoke wagon in his face, then make off with the booze for his own speakeasy. Later, hijacking was associated with taking over airlines, and also what Darwinists do to science.

"Have you been drinking, Cowboy Bob?"

No thanks, it's too early. Cash me later, howbow dah? Actually, I'm having a bit of fun with word history.

"Get on with it!"


Horsfeld's bronze cuckoo engages in avian identity theft
It may be a surprise to learn that Horsfeld's bronze cuckoo can be a real jerk
Credit: Wikimedia Commons / Aviceda (CC BY-SA 3.0)
We can use contemporary words and phrases to describe something observed in nature. In the Land Down Under, sneaky Horsfeld's bronze cuckoos lay their eggs in the nests of "the least faithful birds in the world", superb fairywrens (also called blue wrens), and the interlopers hijack the nests. But the fairywrens have a way of teaching passwords for feeding to their offspring even before they're hatched to deter avian identity theft. Some owlhoots are likely to say that this is an example of evolution. Not hardly! Adaptation, maybe. Or even a design feature given by our Creator. Calling it "evolution" is an illegitimate description.
In this fallen world, even bird households have troubles. One family problem encountered by many bird parents is the nest-security issue of brood parasites, a sneaky form of fowl “home invasion.”

Brood parasitism does not involve parasitic worms or bugs. Rather, it features a different kind of parasite—a freeloading bird family that imposes its baby upon a “host” family. The host family is thereafter burdened with the costs of nurturing the uninvited freeloader. Worse, the invasive guest often competes aggressively with legitimate nestlings for food and shelter.
To finish reading, click on "Pushy Parasites and Parental Passwords". 



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