Welcome to the home of The Question Evolution Project. Presenting information demonstrating that there is no truth in minerals-to-man evolution, and presenting evidence for special creation. —Established by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Mica in Sand Thwarts Secular Geologists

Saddle up and ride over to the gorge-ous Grand Canyon, then take special notice of the rock layers and the various colors. There's a whitish-yellowish part known as the Coconino sandstone that uniformitarian (deep time) geologists think is a problem to creationists. Not happening, pilgrim.

Secular geologists think that the Coconino sandstone at the Grand Canyon is a problem for Flood geology. In fact, the opposite is true.
Credit: Wikimedia Commons / Diego Delso, delso.photo, License CC-by-SA 4.0
Secular geologists say that the Coconino sandstone was made in a desert and could not possibly have been formed by the global Genesis Flood and allows millions of years for evolution to happen. From superficial examination, it does appear to be a problem. Further examination, however, shows that there is mica in the sand, which should not be there under the conditions secularists expect. Instead, this mica supports the Genesis Flood.
My graduate school professor, Dr. Steve Austin, was a serious field geologist. But periodically, his childlike delight in exploring God’s creation shone through. He taught us to let the rocks and the earth “speak to us,” as Job 12:8 (NKJV) said several millennia ago. 
. . .

For some time now, I have been studying a famous layer of yellow rock known as the Coconino Sandstone found in the walls of Grand Canyon. Other creationists and I have devoted many years to this sandstone because most other geologists interpret the sandstone as sand dunes that formed in an ancient desert some 275 million years ago and later fossilized (hardened into rock). How different from the view that Noah’s watery flood laid down these layers quickly around 4,300 years ago!
To read the entire article or download the MP3 with my favorite reader, click on "Mica, Mica in the Sand, Tell Us Something Really Grand!" For additional information, see also, "Coconino Sandstone Myths Debunked".

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