Welcome to the home of The Question Evolution Project. Presenting information demonstrating that there is no truth in minerals-to-man evolution, and presenting evidence for special creation. —Established by Cowboy Bob Sorensen

Monday, August 11, 2014

Evolution is not in the Cards for Sharks

A creature with one of the worst reputations is the shark. It's often a victim of "guilt by association" where people think that just because it's a shark, it will seek you out and kill you. For that matter, the word "shark" covers a lot of ground, because there are various species of shark. This gets more complicated because the hammerhead, for example, comprises more of a family of several species. Most shark attacks on humans are from three kinds, and some of the reports are sketchy. Some of them are huge and alarming to behold, but (like the majority) have no interest in humans. But there's no need to be careless, either.


Basking shark, harmless to humans / Pixabay / tpsdave
Sharks are amazingly efficient at doing shark stuff. Evolutionists have no idea how they evolved (especially the teeth!) and have no plausible models, but they're certain it happened because they presume that evolution is a fact. Realistically, they are examples of the wisdom of their Designer.
Sharks come in all shapes and sizes, from the bizarre–looking hammerhead shark, with its eyes at either end of a double hammer–shaped head, to the angel shark, which has ray–like 'wings'.

All sharks have incredible design features suiting their diet and environment. Those that feed near the surface, like the mako and thresher sharks, are beautifully streamlined and powerful swimmers, allowing them to catch and feed on fast tuna and marlin. Bottom–feeding species, like the above–mentioned whale shark, [Edit: small error there, someone commented to me that the whale shark is not a bottom feeder -CBB] are stout, blunt–headed and are more sluggish, while shellfish–eaters have coarse, pavement–like crushing teeth.

Sharks are among the ocean’s cartilaginous fishes (class Chondrichthyes); that is, those fishes that have a skeleton made of cartilage, rather than being 'bony', and have tooth–like scales (denticles) on their skin.
I really fin you've been hooked and would like to sea the rest of "Sharks: denizens of the deep". 
 


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